The Institute for Women’s Policy and Research (IWPR): ‘The Gender Wage Gap - 2018 Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity’

Increasing governmental pressure on businesses to disclose their pay gaps has vastly improved reporting around this subject. Last year, The Institute for Women’s Policy and Research (IWPR) released their own appraisal on the state of pay, differentiating earnings by gender, race and ethnicity. Though carried out in the USA, this work has clear parallels to working life in the UK.

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Whilst Serenity in Leadership has provided a summary of key findings from this report below, the full paper ‘The Gender Wage Gap: 2018 Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity’ is available at https://iwpr.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/C478_Gender-Wage-Gap-in-2018.pdf

There are multiple metrics for the wage gap; this report makes reference to:

1. Ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings for full-time, year-round workers (a annual earnings ratio of 80.5% - as observed in 2017 - places the wage gap at 19.5%)

2. Ratio of women’s and men’s median weekly full-time earnings (a weekly earnings ratio of 81.1% - as observed in 2017 – places the wage gap at 18.9%)

- When wage gap research expands to include part-time employees, results narrow (women are likelier than men to do part-time work to accommodate childcare or other caregiving work)

- The weekly gender earnings ratio has risen from levels of 62.4% (seen in 1979) to the 81.1% reported here; however, the point change in this has declined decade by decade meaning progress in closing the gender earnings pay gap has slowed considerably.

- Women of all major racial and ethnic groups earn less than their male counterparts in the same group.

- Hispanic workers receive lower weekly earnings than their White, Black and Asian counterparts – Hispanic women earn 61.6% of white men’s median weekly earnings, for example (true of 2018). Black women earn 65.3% of white men’s median weekly earnings whereas Asian women narrow this gap, earning 93.5% of white men’s median weekly earnings.

- This report reiterates the economic benefits that are possible when earning inequalities are targeted; this work estimates raised earnings could equate to a 2.8% increase in GDP.

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Thursday, April 18, 2019
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by Serenity in Leadership
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